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Spring storms bring more than wind and rain, they bring migratory birds that ride in on favorable winds. But why should a tiny bird that spends its winters as far away as Central America make such a long and dangerous trip? One theory suggests that our feathered friends from the tropical south visit every year to take advantage of our longer days and abundance of insects. Over thousands of years this has resulted in greater numbers of offspring. Fascinating and amazing.
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Captured here is a yellow rump warbler perched (for a split second) on a young aspen limb. May is prime birding season, so get out, even in stormy weather and have a look for our colorful seasonal guests in #BigSkyCountry.
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© Kevin League
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Birds of a Feather
Spring storms bring more than wind and rain, they bring migratory birds that ride in on favorable winds. But why should a tiny bird that spends its winters as far away as Central America make such a long and dangerous trip? One theory suggests that our feathered friends from the tropical south visit every year to take advantage of our longer days and abundance of insects. Over thousands of years this has resulted in greater numbers of offspring. Fascinating and amazing.<br />
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Captured here is a yellow rump warbler perched (for a split second) on a young aspen limb. May is prime birding season, so get out, even in stormy weather and have a look for our colorful seasonal guests in #BigSkyCountry.